Reem’s Comment:

I like this idea because it encourages children to learn. When children know there will be an activity after the reading, they will pay more attention. 

This concept gave me some ideas. For example, the teachers draws the tree, and then (depending on their age) she can give each student some paper, and they can write a word about what they learned from the book. If they are unable to read and write on their own, she can ask them to offer their ideas and she can write their comments on pieces of paper.

The key to this is to lead a discussion with the students asking them what they think about the ideas and the story.

As I want to share these ideas, receive new ideas, and discuss the ideas with you, please contact me at: bren.sesh@hotmail.com

I appreciate and read your comments, please continue to do so!

Thank you

Reem

 

Rhyming Tree – Word Game

October 27, 2011

My son is all about games and challenges and this rhyming tree was just the right amount of learning ( and fun) after a long day at preschool.  Whether you homeschool or just add little bits of learning into a day full of errands and play remember that lessons don’t have to be long, they just need to be targeted. This morning as I nursed my daughter my son and I played with rhymes so when he got home I had this tree prepped for him to revisit the rhymes and some new ones too.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some sticky back foam( I used up lots of scrap pieces finally), construction paper ( I also used part of a paper bag… I love reusing things), markers , scissor and a glue stick.
  2. Start by drawing a tree without leaves.
  3. Write one word on each branch.
  4. Cut out and glue on the construction paper.
  5. Write rhyming words on the foam and cut out in the shape of leaves.
  6. Glue the tree on the paper.
  7. Add one rhyming fool . Peel and stick the words onto the rhyming branches. This isn’t a quiet time activity because I added some words to spark discussion like pair and pear as well as said which he recognizes in books but I suspected ( correctly) that out of context he doesn’t recognize. So even a little lesson( or game as my son calls it) like this can let me talk about homonyms and check on his sight words stress free.
  8. He loved it and laughed hysterically at me when I asked if I could add one becuase I was SURE that chair and bee rhymed. Another reason to stay and play… giggles! When we were done he counted up all the words on each branch to see which branch won. Yay a little math too !

The best part about learning to read are these games and play that becomes possible so don’t forget to make words a game…even if there is a lesson or two hidden inside.

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